A Singularity
bryankonietzko:

faitherinhicks:

I’m on the final leg of drawing a graphic novel (54 pages left to ink!!! aaaaaa!!) and am currently in the RRAAR GODZILLA stage of mental sanity. Which is to say, there isn’t much and everything hurts. Especially my shoulders.
I drew the above comic when I finished my second graphic novel, The War at Ellsmere, back in 2008. The mental process I go through drawing a graphic novel remains the same, despite the fact that I’m now a full-time cartoonist, instead of an occasional one. ;) Funny how the line between professional and amateur is … uh, pretty much non-existent. 
Oh yeah, and my most recent graphic novel, Friends With Boys, had 3 typos in it. Nnnoooooo.

Yes. Yessssssssssssss… Replace graphic novel with season of animated episodes, diet Coke with lemon ginger tea, and typos with retakes, and this is me and my experience too. After two years of joy and toil and a million ups and downs, we are just over two weeks out from Book 1 of Korra being completed, aired, and all said and done––all while we’re buried under a mountain of Book 2 production. “WOOOO! DONE!” will last for about a day… then this career of my own making will punch me right in the face again, as it does every day. And I still won’t be able to draw well enough. Or fast enough. Sigh…
FAITH Y R U SO AWSUM? Good luck finishing the book! I can’t wait to read it!
EDIT: A TYPO! …a millions ups and downs… Yeah, time to go home.

Being a professional software developer, I can’t say I go through anything similar to  this process.
But as an writer and would-be author, oh wow yes! Exactly! Yes!

bryankonietzko:

faitherinhicks:

I’m on the final leg of drawing a graphic novel (54 pages left to ink!!! aaaaaa!!) and am currently in the RRAAR GODZILLA stage of mental sanity. Which is to say, there isn’t much and everything hurts. Especially my shoulders.

I drew the above comic when I finished my second graphic novel, The War at Ellsmere, back in 2008. The mental process I go through drawing a graphic novel remains the same, despite the fact that I’m now a full-time cartoonist, instead of an occasional one. ;) Funny how the line between professional and amateur is … uh, pretty much non-existent. 

Oh yeah, and my most recent graphic novel, Friends With Boys, had 3 typos in it. Nnnoooooo.

Yes. Yessssssssssssss… Replace graphic novel with season of animated episodes, diet Coke with lemon ginger tea, and typos with retakes, and this is me and my experience too. After two years of joy and toil and a million ups and downs, we are just over two weeks out from Book 1 of Korra being completed, aired, and all said and done––all while we’re buried under a mountain of Book 2 production. “WOOOO! DONE!” will last for about a day… then this career of my own making will punch me right in the face again, as it does every day. And I still won’t be able to draw well enough. Or fast enough. Sigh…

FAITH Y R U SO AWSUM? Good luck finishing the book! I can’t wait to read it!

EDIT: A TYPO! …a millions ups and downs… Yeah, time to go home.

Being a professional software developer, I can’t say I go through anything similar to  this process.

But as an writer and would-be author, oh wow yes! Exactly! Yes!

Charlie Stross, an author of science fiction among other things, wrote an article in response to an SF Signal discussion of the question: 

"Are SF writers "slacking off" or is science fiction still the genre of "big ideas"? If so, what authors are supplying these ideas for the next generation of scientists and engineers?"

And so he wrote this article: SF, big ideas, ideology: what is to be done? by By Charlie Stross

He discusses the history of science fiction as well as a few other topics. Let me quote one paragraph:

The second assumption is that science fiction has primarily been a genre of big ideas. I’m not at all sure that this is the case. Certainly fiction with big ideas has found a home within SF, but that’s not the same thing at all! For almost all of its history, most SF has been pulp adventure fiction, conceived and written as escapism — lest we forget, Damon Knight’s original characterisation of space opera as horse opera (the Western) with blasters instead of six-guns and space ships instead of horses still holds water. The big ideas are, if anything, secondary, not to mention exhibiting a tendency to date badly and carry sinister ideological overtones (as William Gibson so brilliantly skewered in his short story “The Gernsback Continuum”).

The entire article is well worth reading.

Source

Those of you already snickering at the title should probably just click here right now.

Mira Grant is the author of the Newsflesh triology, of which the third and final chapter just hit bookshelves not a few days ago. Mira Grant also happens to be the well-known pen name of Seanan McGuire. Seanan McGuire is the author of several urban fantasy series including October Daye and Incryptid.

And in this article, Seanan McGuire interviews Mira Grant. Enjoy!

The following is a quote from Writing Across Gender by 

I don’t think it’s terribly controversial to note that women, from a young age, are required to consider the reality of the opposite gender’s consciousness in a way that men aren’t. This isn’t to say that women don’t often misunderstand, mistreat, and stereotype men, both in literature and in life. But on a basic level, functioning in society requires that women register that men are fully conscious; it is not really possible for a woman to throw up her hands and write men off as eternally unknowable space aliens — and even if she says she has, she cannot really behave as though she has. Every element of her life — from reading books about boys and men to writing papers about the motivations of male characters to being attentive to her own safety to navigating most any institutional or professional or economic sphere — demands an ironclad familiarity with, and belief in, the idea that men really are fully human entities. And no matter how many men come to the same conclusions about women, the structure of society simply does not demand so strenuously that they do so. If you didn’t really deep down believe that women were, in general, exactly as conscious as you, you could probably still get by in life. You could probably still get a book deal. You could probably still get elected to office.

I don’t think I’ve ever considered gender equality issues from this kind of viewpoint before, which is why I felt like sharing it. If you are interested in the affects this can have upon writing, please read the entire article at www.PowellsBooks.com

H.P. Lovecraft Answers Your Relationship Questions by James Warner

An impressive and hilarious little article, if you can translate the mode of speech, where in H.P. Lovecraft answers questions regarding people’s love lives. Kinda.

As requested by too many people: making the last post rebloggable

wilwheaton:

neil-gaiman:

birdartpoetry asked: Mister Gaiman, you’re kickass. I was just wondering, what do you think is the best way to seduce a writer? I figured your answer would be pretty spectacular.

In my experience, writers tend to be really good at the inside of their own heads and imaginary people, and a lot less good at the stuff going on outside, which means that quite often if you flirt with us we will completely fail to notice, leaving everybody involved slightly uncomfortable and more than slightly unlaid.

So I would suggest that any attempted seduction of a writer would probably go a great deal easier for all parties if you sent them a cheerful note saying “YOU ARE INVITED TO A SEDUCTION: Please come to dinner on Friday Night. Wear the kind of clothes you would like to be seduced in.”

And alcohol may help, too. Or kissing. Many writers figure out that they’re being seduced or flirted with if someone is actually kissing them.

This also works if you substitute “Nerd” for “Writer.”

Speaking as both, I really know what I’m talking about.

How blame for colorism works in fandom

The following is a well written article about the writing of race. In particular it focuses on writing the descriptions for characters who already have an established ethnicity that gives a non-white skin tone but instead describing them as tan. Not only is it factually inaccurate but racially insensitive and offensive to some.

The following article assumes a basic knowledge of the television series Avatar: The Last Airbender.

racebending:

Like the characters Katara and Sokka from [Avatar: The Last Airbender], Korra clearly has darker skin than many of her counterpart characters. It is very rare for a woman character to be the titular character of an action show; even rarer to see a woman of color with dark skn doing so, given the colorist society we live in.

A number of fan fiction stories, fan arts, and blog posts have described or depicted Korra as “tan,” “tan-skinned,” “tan-colored,” or even “with a tan.” To fans who care about diversity in media and in the Avatar fandom, this is really hurtful and painful to see. It’s a callback to when Jackson Rathborne, the white actor cast to play Sokka in the film adaptation The Last Airbender, joked to press who had brought up fan concerns that he would simply “get a tan” to darken his skin to play Sokka.

Beyond Rathborne’s words is the context behind the word “tan.” Once used simply to describe a pale brown color (tannin from oak trees), it is now colloquially used to refer to darkening the skin by sunbathing (“getting a tan.”) As a result, the word tan is not usually used to describe people of color (or women of color like Korra) since she does not need to “get a tan” to get her naturally darker-than-pale-brown skin. The proess of tanning remains the purview (some would say privilege) of people with very light skin—primarily people who are racialized as white. In contrast, almost universally across the world, people who are not light skinned do not want to tan, cannot benefit from tanning, and instead concentrate their efforts on lightening their skin—through skin bleaching using poisonous chemicals, hiding from the sun, putting toxic products in their hair, etc. in an attempt to escape the oppression of colorism.

It’s much simpler to call Korra “brown” than “tan.” It shakes off the connection to Rathbone’s ignorant statement and avoids insulting fans of color since the word “tan” implies her skin color was acquired, not natural.

marikunin:

avatarluffy:

marikunin:

KORRA IS BROWN. NOT “TAN”.

Stop… I beg of you. Don’t start this shit again. Both you and I will regret it.

I’ll stop when the whitewashing in the fandom stops.

Here, a tumblr poster voices her frustration about the numerous times she has seen Korra called “tan.” Another poster responds “begging” her not to “start this,” lest both of them “regret it”

This response implies two things: a) That avatarluffy has to “beg” marikunin to not raise the issue (or suffer regret) implies that marikunin is in a position of power and that her raising this issue is actively harmful. b) that by raising the issue, marikunin is the one to “start” it, even though marikunin is being reactional and the people who actually triggered the debate were the ones who chose a connotation-loaded word to describe Korra’s skin color.

The reality is that fans who care about the use of the word “tan” or about cultural competence in fandom are not in a position of power. If they are upset by the word “tan” they choose between silent acceptance and what they see as a dilution of Korra’s significance as a protagonist of color, or speaking out and being blamed for causing a problem, even if they are simply responding to a conversation started by someone else.

Begging fans who are impacted by the word choice of “tan” to stop speaking out is begging them to accept marginalization. Blaming them for “starting shit” takes accountability away from the people who chose to use a term with an offensive connotation behind it (tan implies that Korra is not really dark skinned.) And the threat that “both you and I will regret it” doesn’t take into account that staying silent comes with its own regrets already—with the burden placed on fans of color.

While there are likely people out there who deliberately chose to use the word “tan” to describe Korra with the intention of deemphasizing her brownness, it is more likely that most fans who used “tan” are not aware of the context behind the word, or that use of the word could have a racist impact.

Hopefully, when this hurtful impact is pointed out to them, most of these fans will opt to drop the word tan in favor of brown or another more accurate descriptor. That would certainly be easier than defending the use of the word “tan” by guilt-tripping (“I beg of you”), blame (“you’re starting shit”) and threats (“or you and I will regret it.”) By respecting that one of the many facets that makes Korra groundbreaking is her skin tone, we better recognize the production of Legend of Korra’s accomplishments in breaking down glass ceilings in entertainment.

An opinion piece of the state of the publish industry by Sarah Lacy, editor-in-chief of PandoDaily. I found it somewhat illuminating. 

Writing & Video: Extra Credits

Extra Credits has moved to Penny Arcade TV! And they’re still making poignant commentary on video games, and even more. Take this episode for example:

Extra Credits: Season 3: Episode 7 - Pacing

This show talks about pacing, referencing Star Wars and video games. But pacing applies to almost any medium that tells a story, including writing. The analogy talking about eating candy is perfectly correct about how people take in story elements, tone, and pacing of a story, whether they are playing it, reading it, watching it, or even play acting it. As writers and creators, we should be keeping this pacing of experience in mind.